Quick Thoughts on the Fourth Season Premiere of “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.”

(Promotional image above courtesy of ABC.)

After months of my son asking me when is the premiere of (his favorite TV show) Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., we finally got to watch it. Just a few thoughts I had:

  • Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.Brett Dalton + a 10:00 pm starting time = me feeling some kind of way. Sleepy, for one.
  • I like Agent Coulson more than Director Coulson.
  • FitzSimmons are much more attractive now that they’ve gotten together. They should have done this a long time ago!
  • Note to Agent May: You really looked like such a hater when you were talking to Gemma. Not a good look for you.
  • Wonder how Mack will use his exploding pen…
  • Who’s faster — Yo Yo or Quicksilver? I hate Quicksilver, so I hope it’s Yo Yo. But I think The Flash is faster than both.
  • I like Gabriel Luna as Robbie Reyes/Ghost Rider. Even if he does look like the IT guy at my job. (The flaming skull would be appropriate after the IT guy tells someone for the fifth time to make sure the computer is on!)
  • So, just as I’ve gotten used to calling Skye Daisy, now I have to call her Quake?!? Sigh!
  • Note to self: Sliding Doors (starring John Hannah, who plays Dr. Radcliffe) is now on Netflix. Watch it!
  • If she was on, I missed her, but I heard that Parminder Nagra is on the show now. As an aside, I think she’d make an awesome Doctor Who.
  • This single episode was more racially/ethnically diverse than many networks’ entire schedules (I’m looking at you, CBS).

Looking forward to watching more episodes this season, even if the 10:00 start means a later bedtime for my son (and me).

Lynda Carter Addresses “Wonder Woman ’77” and Her Music Career on The Today Show

Sorry that I haven’t posted for a while.  Just wanted to share of this interview of Lynda Carter by those two tipsy chicks Hoda and Kathie Lee on the 34th, er, 4th hour of NBC’s The Today Show.  She talks about “Wonder Woman ’77” and her music career.  She also demonstrates the fact that she hasn’t lassoed anyone in decades!

http://www.today.com/video/lynda-carter-still-has-her-wonder-woman-costume-429106755517

Opinion: What We Want to See More of and Less of in 2015

We at Pop Rocking Culture have come up with a short list of what we want to see more of and less of in pop culture in the next year.  Some are very obvious, while some less so.  Here we go:

Up Arrow

WHAT WE WANT TO SEE MORE OF IN 2015:

1. Adventure shows like Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D..

Agents of SHIELD 4

As regular readers of this blog probably guessed, we are big fans of MAOS at Pop Rocking Culture.  Sure, you have Arrow and The Flash, but we want more!

2. Truly funny social media memes.  When it came to new memes, we wondered if anything would rise to the level of the famous Batman slapping Robin meme.  Some new memes were a bit confusing — what does Kermit the Frog drinking tea have to do with anything?  But Michael Jackson eating popcorn as he eagerly awaits comments?  Pres. Obama anticipating blame?  Those are funny!  Keep it coming, you people with nothing better to do!

3.  The Simpsons.  This created a bit of controversy here at Pop Rocking Culture — aren’t there 25 years worth of episodes to watch?  But Blue Striker wants this show to go on forever!  Hope you’re reading this, Fox and Matt Groening!

4. Wonder Woman.  Earlier this year, Pop Rocking Culture posted a couple of articles about the casting and directing of upcoming movies featuring Wonder Woman.  Add to that the bestselling book, Jill Lepore’s The Secret History of Wonder Woman, and you have a regular Amazing Amazon renaissance going on.  Coming in 2015:  Wonder Woman ’77, a digital comic book featuring the world of Wonder Woman as it was portrayed in the iconic 1970s TV show starring Lynda Carter, and another Wonder Woman book, Noah Berlatsky’s explicitly titled Wonder Woman: Bondage and Feminism in the Marston/Peter Comics, 1941-1948.

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WHAT WE WANT TO SEE LESS OF IN 2015:

Unfortunately, this list is much more obvious, because A LOT OF PEOPLE want to see less of:

1. Justin Bieber.

Fun meme of Justin Bieber mugshot

Fun meme of Justin Bieber mugshot

Good Justin, Bad Justin.  How about No Justin?

2. Kim Kardashian.  This includes her body parts, as well as her entire extended family.

3. Will and Kate.  Another controversial selection by Blue Striker, because I love Will, Kate and the children (those here and yet to come).  But I can see where Blue is coming from — he’s an American boy who has absolutely no use for royalty.

4. Family Guy.  Okay, you had your revival.  The door is to your right.

What do you think?  Do you agree?  Disagree?  We want to hear from you!

Reaction: Blair Underwood joins Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (contains possible spoilers)

As much as I love Blair Underwood (I’m a fan of his Facebook page), I was rather annoyed at the news that he’s going to join the cast of Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (MAOS).  I am convinced that Underwood has some dirt on important people in the TV business, as it seems that a year doesn’t pass without him on yet another TV show.  I think that the only reason why Blair Underwood hasn’t been on TV much this past year is because he was performing in the revival of the play The Trip to Bountiful, which I saw and enjoyed very much.

Maybe MAOS needed another Black guy in the cast since the show decided to kill off Agent Triplett (B.J. Britt) in the last episode before the mid-season break.  Triplett’s death resulted, as par for the course for the show, in leaving a few things unresolved. I was waiting for Agent Triplett to make a big revelation regarding something his grandfather (who I assume was Gabe Jones of the Howling Commandos) discovered during World War II.  But, on the other hand, judging from what happened to Agent Coulson, in the Marvel Universe, presumably dead people don’t necessarily stay dead!

Clark Gregg (Agent Phil Coulson) and Ming-Na Wen (Agent Melinda May) at the 2014 PaleyFest panel on Marvel's Agents of Shield.

Clark Gregg (Agent Phil Coulson) and Ming-Na Wen (Agent Melinda May) at the 2014 PaleyFest panel on Marvel’s Agents of Shield.

Going back to the casting of Blair Underwood, I noticed that both he and Clark Gregg (Agent Coulson) were both on The New Adventures of Old Christine.  Underwood played a boyfriend of Christine (Julia Louis-Dreyfus), which Gregg played Christine’s ex-husband.  On MAOS, Underwood is Agent Melinda May’s (Ming-Na Wen) ex-husband, while there have been hints of a past relationship between Agent May and Agent Coulson.  Coincidence?  I don’t know, but I’m waiting for Wanda Sykes to show up as Agent May’s best friend!

Relevance is Comin’ to Town: Rankin/Bass Productions and Santa Claus

Earlier this year, Arthur Rankin, one of the founders of Rankin/Bass Productions with Jules Bass, died at age 89.  Rankin/Bass Productions (“RBP”) is probably best known for its Christmas TV specials, such as Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, Santa Claus is Comin’ to Town and The Year Without a Santa Claus.  These specials have become so much a part of American pop culture it seems that a Christmas season doesn’t go by without a spoof of one.  One of the things that made the specials appealing at the time they were originally broadcast, and which contributes to their continuing appeal, is the parallels of the story lines to what was happening in the United States at the time.

Although Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer (1964), based on the popular song, focuses on the titular reindeer, Santa Claus plays an important role.  Rudolph, first broadcast during the time of the Civil Rights Movement, presents many lessons in acceptance.  When Santa at first rejects Rudolph based on his appearance, it reminds one of the real-life intolerance many authority figures of the 1960s had towards those who looked different.  (One could go further with this idea – was the Island of Misfit Toys a ghetto?) Once Santa recognizes Rudolph’s abilities, he realizes that Rudolph, given the chance, can be a productive member of North Pole society.  Similarly, the subplot regarding Hermey, the elf who wanted to be a dentist reflected the increasing desire of young people of the time to follow a path different from that of their parents.  That Hermey was able to work at the North Pole fixing dolls’ teeth showed that even the most traditional of places can find room for those who have different ideas.

In contrast to the authoritarian of Rudolph, Santa is downright rebellious in 1970’s Santa Claus is Comin’ to Town (“SCCT”).  SCCT, first shown during the height of the “youthquake” of the Baby Boom generation, is the story of how the young and cute Kris Kringle becomes the jolly old elf we all know so well.   Kris, with his long, almost Beatlesque red hair and his sunny demeanor, spurs an uprising against the old uptight ways of the establishment – personified by the grumpy, anti-toy Burgermeister Meisterburger.  Along the way, Kris manages to find romance with the lovely town schoolteacher Jessica. In a scene that has been cut from recent showings of SCCT, Jessica sings about the changes Kris has brought to her and her town.  This reflects the real-life changes that youth brought to American life during the 1960s and early 1970s.

SCCT also draws a parallel between Santa and another iconic figure – Superman.  Both Santa and Superman were foundlings adopted by elderly couples.  Both assume an identity (Kris Kringle/Clark Kent) separate from their true identities (Claus/Kal-El).  Both have special powers that don’t manifest themselves until adulthood.  SCCT manages to wrap the heretofore mysterious Santa in a cloak (or cape, as it may be) familiar to many viewers.

A few years later, in 1974, RBP introduced The Year Without a Santa Claus (“YWSC”).  Departing from the generally “known” aspects of Santa’s world, and based on a book by Phyllis McGinley, YWSC was released at a time of moral crises in the United States.  The events of Watergate and the subsequent resignation of President Richard Nixon, as well as the withdrawal of American troops from Vietnam, were on the minds of the American people.  Meanwhile, at the North Pole, Santa sees the increased disbelief in the spirit of Christmas.  Disappointed and discouraged, Santa decides to take a (permanent?) vacation instead of delivering toys.  It’s up to Mrs. Claus, with the help of a couple of elves, the reindeer Vixen, and a bunch of kids in a small Sunbelt town, to get her husband back in the sleigh.  The casting of Shirley Booth, TV’s “Hazel” from the 1960s, as Mrs. Claus is appropriate here. (This was also Shirley Booth’s last acting role.) Just as Hazel the maid took charge of a dysfunctional household, Mrs. Claus takes charge during the chaos.  In real life as well, women were beginning to take charge in many ways.

But despite the fact that Santa is encouraged enough to resume his duties (of course), YWSC may have been seen as too cynical for some people.  Network TV hasn’t shown this off-canon look at Santa Claus since 1980. The cable channel ABC Family does show YWSC as part of its “25 Days of Christmas”.  This hasn’t affected the popularity of YWSC one bit – there are regular references to it in other parts of pop culture.

Rudolph, SCCT and YWSC demonstrate that Rankin/Bass Productions, and in turn Arthur Rankin and (the still living) Jules Bass, recognized that American society was undergoing a shift.  Rankin and Bass were aware as well of the pop culture of the time, and of the need to be relevant to television viewers, no matter what their age or knowledge of current affairs.  For many of us who, as kids, sat in front of the television in our pajamas year after year, the underlying themes of these shows sunk in.  In any case, we continue to hold these shows dear in our hearts.

Lynne a.k.a. Poprocker1

Review: Marvel 75 Years: From Pulp to Pop!

Last night, in lieu of an episode of Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., ABC presented a special, Marvel 75 Years: From Pulp to Pop! in celebration of Marvel Comics’ 75th anniversary.  The cynic in me noted that the special was really a 30 minute infomercial for upcoming Marvel television shows and movies (with commercials for Disneyland, ABC television shows and other products associated with Marvel’s parent company Disney).  Still, I thought the special was pretty informative, especially for people unfamiliar with Marvel’s early years (as Timely Comics around World War II, and during the “superhero revival” of the 1960s).   I had a good laugh when (Poprockingculture contributor) Blue Striker mentioned that the young Stan Lee resembled Bill Everett’s 1940s version of the Sub-Mariner.

It was great to see some of the faces behind the names of people who worked on comics when I actively read them during the 1970s and 1980s, such as Denny O’Neil (DC’s Green Lantern/Green Arrow) and Steve Englehart (Doctor Strange and The Defenders).  I would have loved to see Steve Ditko (co-creator of Spiderman and Doctor Strange) in the special.  However, despite the fact that the interviewees mentioned Ditko’s name numerous times, the notoriously reclusive creator continued his 40-plus year “no interview” streak.

It was interesting (but not surprising) that the special skipped over recent Marvel movies not produced by Marvel Entertainment.  I found the special’s attitude towards these films rather dismissive and in the same light as earlier attempts at cartoons and television shows during the 1960s through the 1980s.  (Stan Lee did have something good to say about the 1970s TV series The Incredible Hulk, however.)  I guess that given the success of the non-Marvel Entertainment properties, including the Andrew Garfield and Tobey Maguire Spiderman series (produced by Sony Pictures), the X-Men series and the (less successful) Fantastic Four movies (both 20th Century Fox); one wonders what the special could say.

The special also highlighted the cultural changes that have influenced Marvel Comics, such as Vietnam War and the women’s rights and civil rights movements.  Of course, there was a mention of the Black Panther, ostensibly because of the 2015 movie starring Chadwick Boseman.  I would have liked more diversity in the interviewees who work for Marvel in the present day (because there wasn’t any years ago).  But that’s a topic for another post…

Marvel 75 Years: From Pulp to Pop! was a good diversion from:  1) waiting for the other shoe to drop regarding plot developments in Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and 2) the tedious midterm election result coverage (although I did vote).

Lynne, a.k.a. Poprocker1