Favorite Dads in Pop Culture

Dumbledore is one of our favorite "dads"!

Dumbledore is one of our favorite “dads”!

Since Father’s Day is coming up, Blue Striker and I were discussing our favorite dads in pop culture. Now, mind you, these aren’t necessarily good dads, but here they are (in no particular order):

Marlin in Finding Nemo: As Blue Striker says, how can anyone who crosses the entire ocean to find his son not be a good dad? Marlin (voiced by Albert Brooks) is a great dad, Finding Nemo is a great film and one of Pixar’s best.

Sheriff Andy Taylor in The Andy Griffith Show: Purveyor of homespun homilies? Check. Good guy who isn’t uptight? Check. Able to successfully police the crazy inhabitants of his town, starting with his wacky deputy, Barney Fife? Check. Great sense of humor? Check. Opie Taylor’s dad manages to do all this while raising his son as a single dad (with the help of Aunt Bea, of course).

Mung Daal in Chowder: Mung (voiced by Dwight Schultz, better known as “Mad Dog Murdock” of The A-Team) is more of a father figure than a father (Chowder’s his apprentice). Although at times Mung is impatient with his much less than perfect apprentice, he possesses the daffiness of a Cartoon Network character (which he is) as well as the best cartoon mustache since Snidely Whiplash.

Albus Dumbledore in the Harry Potter series (books and movies): Harry lucked out when he fell under the tutelage of the wise and powerful Headmaster of Hogwarts (played by Richard Harris and Michael Gambon in the movies), especially when you consider the alternative.

Fred G. Sanford in Sanford and Son: The “G” stands for “great googly moogly, how can you leave him out?” Redd Foxx (born John Elroy Sanford, whose brother was Fred Sanford) was hilarious as the cranky junkman with a heart of gold, particularly when it came to his son Lamont, who could be unappreciative and self-centered at times.

Jonathan “Pa” Kent in practically every iteration of Superman: The guiding force behind the Man of Steel. The fact that actors known for playing “good guys”, such as  Glenn Ford, John Schneider and Kevin Costner, have portrayed Pa Kent tells us much about his character.

Review: The Interview – Better Late Than Never, I Guess

Well, now that all of the hoopla over The Interview has died down, we here at Pop Rocking Culture recently watched the movie.  (An aside:  Yes, Blue Striker did watch the movie with Bill, Dad and me.  Blue will tell you, in his words, that this movie is “inappropriate for kids”. I had to cover Blue’s eyes about two times.  When asked for a reaction to the movie, Blue gave a mock vomiting sound — not exactly a thumbs up.)

The Interview is yet another in a string of “bromances” that get a lot of play at the movie theater.  It was obvious that one of the sources the film drew from was the old Bob Hope/Bing Crosby “Road” movies.  This movie could have been called The Road to Pyongyang.  In case you were wondering, James Franco is in the “goofball” Bob Hope role that spurs the plot of the film.  Seth Rogen has the “smart guy” Bing Crosby part, and even gets the girl (for a while).  Yes, I know that Rogen resembles the suave, witty crooner as much as he did Van Williams’ Britt Reid in The Green Hornet.  Read into that what you will.

I admit that I laughed a lot at James Franco’s Dave Skylark character.  His hair, wardrobe, political/social cluelessness and monumental ego were pretty funny.  Skylark’s relationship with Randall Park’s Kim Jong Un is the real romance, er, bromance here.  (I am sure that the gay subtext regarding Kim was one of the things that made the North Korean government unhappy.)  Park had the best role in the movie, as the unpredictable “Supreme Leader”.  Park, who currently plays the dad on Fresh Off the Boat, is definitely a Hollywood version of Kim Jong Un, right down to the perfect teeth.  At one point, I found myself wondering who Park’s orthodonist was. (Oh, come on, NO ONE has teeth that great naturally!)

Unfortunately, at the end, the movie stretches an already absurd story to the breaking point.  The movie becomes a rather bloody, bad (unintentional?) parody of an action movie.  I rolled my eyes at the shift in tone. I thought, all of sudden, these buffoons know how to fight/shoot guns/drive a tank successfully?

To wrap it up, The Interview, while it wasn’t as bad as I expected, wasn’t as good as it could have been.  It wasn’t worth risking the wrath of a country that is both unknown and unpredictable — whether or not North Korea was responsible for the Sony hack.*  I found myself wanting to watch Team America:  World Police again…later.  Because as “inappropriate” as The Interview is for kids, Team America is really inappropriate.  But it’s a much better movie!

*P.S.:  Suki Kim’s memoir about teaching the sons of the North Korean elite in North Korea, Without You, There Is No Us, is a great book.